5 child safety tips for a toddler's room

How safe is your toddler's bedroom?

It's a question many parents may be asking themselves after a video showing a 2-year old boy saving his twin brother from a fallen dresser went viral Tuesday.

The twin boys were climbing on a dressing in their bedroom when it tipped over and pinned one of the boys underneath. The trapped boy's brother managed to move the dresser off the boy and there were no serious injuries.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that injuries are the leading cause of death in children ages 19 and younger. The CDC says many of these injuries are preventable. According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, (CPSC) a child dies every two weeks when a TV, furniture or appliance falls on him or her. 

What can parents do to keep their young children safe in their bedroom, especially once they are toddlers and out of a crib? Here are 5 safety tips for to consider for all toddlers' bedrooms.

  1. Anchor furniture to the wall. The Consumer Product Safety Commission sponsors the "Anchor It!" program. This campaign provides instructional videos and other information for parents on why and how to "anchor and protect" the furniture in a room to help prevent accidents like the one in the viral video above. 
  2. Keep windows locked . Ranked as one of the top 5 hidden home hazards by the CPSC, windows can lead to double trouble with little ones around. First, make sure to have working window locks on every window in the house, especially in a child's bedroom. For an extra layer of security, consider adding window mesh, which can help prevent children from falling out an open window.
  3. Watch windows blinds for choking hazards. Windows blinds pose a choking hazard for children because of window blind cords and the pieces that are on them. Parents should shorten all cords so children cannot reach them or even get cordless blinds. Lastly, keep all furniture away from windows (cribs, dressers, changing tables, etc.)
  4. Restrict outlet access. Instead of using the small plastic outlet plugs that little fingers can pry off, consider using a self closing outlet or an outlet box to keep children away from possible electrocution.
  5. Get some gates. One of the most exciting things for toddlers is the new freedom they experience. It also causes some anxiety for parents. If you don't want to put a gate directly on your child's door, then make sure there are gates on the stairs or other rooms where curious toddlers may want to explore in the middle of the night. 
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