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How to detect the "silent killer," carbon monoxide inside homes

1 in 10 people in Florida use natural gas
Posted at 5:24 PM, Apr 03, 2017

Over the weekend, one person was found dead and 8 others were hospitalized after a group of people were found unconscious around a hotel's indoor pool in southern Michigan.

RELATED: Carbon monoxide at hotel pool suspected in Michigan death

Fire officials said they believe the cause was carbon monoxide poisoning.

Around one in ten people in Florida use natural gas for their homes, according to TECO Peoples Gas. 

It's a reminder that carbon monoxide is odorless and you can't see it. 

TECO adds a chemical to give it a distinctive "rotten egg" smell to indicate a possible natural gas leak. 

The most common natural gas appliances are:

  • water heater
  • stove 
  • clothes dryer
  • pool heater

TECO sends out a scratch and sniff flyer once a year, that allows customers to get a smell of the added chemical. 

Tampa Fire and Rescue District Chief Mark Bogush says CO detectors should be installed outside the rooms you sleep if you have natural gas, but avoid ceilings.

"They recommend that anywhere to knee or about ten to twelve inches from the ceiling," said Bogush. 

If you smell natural gas and suspect a leak, leave the area, go outside and call 877-TECO-PGS or 911.