APTOPIX Sept 11 Museum
The remains of Fire Dept. of New York Ladder Company 3's truck are displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)Photo by: AP
Sept 11 Museum
Steel from the World Trader Center north tower floors 97 and 98, left, is displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)Photo by: AP
Dedication Ceremony for the National September 11 Memorial Museum
Fog looms lover the memorial plaza during the dedication ceremony for National September 11 Memorial Museum in New York, Thursday, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Allan Tannenbaum, Pool) Photo by: AP
Sept. 11 Anniversary Shanksville
Wells Morrison with the FBI rings the large bell during the name presentation and "Bells of Remberance" portion of the ceremony near the temporary memorial and crash site of United Flight 93, Friday, Sept. 11, 2009, in Shanksville, Pa. United Flight 93 crashed in Shanksville, Pa, Sept. 11, 2001, after passengers and crew diverted the hijacked airplane from its intended target Washington, D.C. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)Photo by: AP
Sept 11 Flight 93
A bereaved family member mourns near the Wall of Names near the crash site of Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pa. Sunday Sept. 11, 2011. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)Photo by: AP
Sept 11 Museum Preview
Shoes and personal items on display during a press preview of the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Wednesday, May. 14, 2014 in New York. The museum opens on May 21, 2014. (AP Photo/The Daily News, James Keivom, Pool) Photo by: AP
Sept 11 Museum
The twisted remains of a portion of the television transmission tower from the World Trade Center is displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)Photo by: AP
Sept 11 Museum Preview
New York City Fire Department Firefighter Christian Waugh's helmet he wore on September 11, 2001, are on display during a press preview of the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Wednesday, May. 14, 2014 in New York. The museum opens on May 21, 2014. (AP Photo/The Daily News, James Keivom, Pool) Photo by: AP
Sept 11 Museum
In this Sept. 6, 2013, file photo, a visitor to the National September 11 Memorial and Museum takes in the sight as he walks past the museum in New York. The long-awaited museum dedicated to the victims of the Sept. 11 terror attacks will open to the public at the World Trade Center site on May 21, officials announced Monday, March 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)Photo by: AP
Sept 11 Museum
Visitors to the Sept. 11 Memorial, left, peer at pair of World Trade Center tridents, that once formed part of the exterior structural support of the east facade of the building, in the Sept. 11 Museum, in New York, Wednesday, May 14, 2014. Leaders of the soon-to-open Sept. 11 museum are portraying it as a monument to unity and resilience. (AP Photo)Photo by: AP
World Trade Center
The only existing model of the World Trade Center is displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)Photo by: AP
APTOPIX Sept 11-Pennsylvania
Visitors to the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pa., participate in a sunset memorial service on Monday, Sept. 10, 2012. Tuesday marks the 11th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)Photo by: AP
Sept 11 Museum Preview
Objects recovered from the World Trade Center site on display during a press preview of the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Wednesday, May. 14, 2014 in New York. The museum opens on May 21, 2014. (AP Photo/The Daily News, James Keivom, Pool) Photo by: AP
Sept 11 Museum
In this photo taken Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013, the wedge-shaped pavilion entrance of the National September 11 Museum, center, is located between the square outlines of the memorial waterfalls at the World Trade Center in New York. Construction is racing ahead inside the museum as the 12th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks draws near. Several more large artifacts have been installed in the cavernous space below the World Trade Center memorial plaza. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)Photo by: AP
Sept 11 Museum
A woman looks in the windows of the National September 11 Memorial Museum during a dedication ceremony for the museum at ground zero in New York, Thursday, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/The Daily News, James Keivom, Pool) Photo by: AP
Flight 93 Memorial
This is a wall of photos of the 40 crew and passengers who perished in the crash of the United Airlines Flight 93 on display at the new Flight 93 National Memorial Visitors Center in Shanksville, Pa, on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. The visitors center will be formally dedicated and open to the public on Sept. 10, 2015. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)Photo by: AP
Sept 11 Museum
The burn mask, right, of a World Trade Center survivor who was injured by burning jet fuel, is displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)Photo by: AP
Dedication ceremony for the National September 11 Memorial Museum in New York
First responders Manny Rodriguez, Pia Hofmann, Det. Anthony Favara, of the NYPD and Lt. Stephen Butler, of the Port Authority Police, speak next to the "Last Beam" during the dedication ceremony at the National September 11 Memorial Museum. in New York on Thursday, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/The Star-Ledger, John Munson, Pool)Photo by: AP
during the dedication ceremony at the National September 11 Memorial Museum in New York, May 15, 2014.
A twisted piece of steel from the World Trade Center sits in Foundation Hall before the dedication ceremony at the National September 11 Memorial Museum in New York, Thursday, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/The Record of Bergen County, Chris Pedota, Pool) Photo by: AP
President Obama, Officials Attend 9/11 Memorial Museum Opening Ceremony
People at the Ground Zero memorial site wait to see President Barack Obama during the dedication ceremony of the National September 11 Memorial Museum on Thursday, May 15, 2014 in New York. (AP Photo/Spencer Platt, Pool)Photo by: AP
Sept 11 Museum
Two tridents from the World Trade Center are on display inside the National September 11 Memorial Museum before a dedication ceremony at the museum Thursday, May 15, 2014, in New York. The museum will open to the public on May 21. (AP Photo/Allan Tannenbaum, Pool)Photo by: AP
Sept 11 Museum
In this Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013, file photo taken with a fisheye lens, One World Trade Center, center, overlooks the wedge-shaped pavilion entrance of the National September 11 Museum, lower right, and the square outlines of the memorial waterfalls in New York. The long-awaited museum dedicated to the victims of the Sept. 11 terror attacks will open to the public at the World Trade Center site on May 21, officials announced Monday, March 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)Photo by: AP
Sept 11 Museum
In this file photo of June 19, 2011, a damaged New York Fire Department truck is stored in Hangar 17 at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. The truck is part of the collection of artifacts for the National September 11 Museum. The long-awaited museum dedicated to the victims of the Sept. 11 terror attacks will open to the public at the World Trade Center site on May 21, officials announced Monday, March 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)Photo by: AP
Sept 11 Museum
People attend the Dedication Ceremony of the National September 11 Memorial Museum in the museum's Foundation Hall on Thursday, May 15, 2014 in New York. (AP Photo/Newsday, Charles Eckert, Pool) Photo by: AP
APTOPIX Sept 11 Museum
From left, Former U.S. President Bill Clinton sits with his wife former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former New York Governor George Pataki and former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani during the dedication ceremony at the National September 11 Memorial Museum in New York, Thursday, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Mike Segar, Pool) Photo by: AP
Sept 11 Museum
The remains of New York City Fire Dept. truck from Engine Company 21 are displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)Photo by: AP
Sept 11 Museum
Visitors gather on the plaza of the National September 11 Memorial to watch a telecast of the dedication ceremony for the National September 11 Memorial Museum in New York, Thursday, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/The Daily News, James Keivom, Pool) Photo by: AP
Sept 11 Museum
Portraits of the Al-Qaeda hijackers are displayed at the National Sept. 11 Memorial Museum, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in New York. The museum is a monument to how the Sept. 11 terror attacks shaped history, from its heart-wrenching artifacts to the underground space that houses them amid the remnants of the fallen twin towers' foundations. It also reflects the complexity of crafting a public understanding of the terrorist attacks and reconceiving ground zero. (AP Photo)Photo by: AP
Dedication Ceremony for the National September 11 Memorial Museum
New York Mayor Bill De Blasio and his wife wife Chirlane McCray visit the memorial after the dedication ceremony at the National September 11 Memorial Museum in New York, Thursday, May 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Allan Tannenbaum, Pool) Photo by: AP
Flight 93 Memorial Wreckage
A visitor to the Flight 93 National Memorial pauses at the Wall of Names containing the names of the 40 passengers and crew of United Flight 93 that were killed in this field on Sept. 11, 2001, on Thursday, May 31, 2018. Later this year, the remaining wreckage of Flight 93 will be returned to the Flight 93 National Memorial to be buried in the restricted access zone, in the woods beyond the Wall of Names marked by a giant boulder, where they will not be accessible to the public or media. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)Photo by: AP
UNITED FLIGHT 93 CRASH SITE
In this Sept. 16, 2001 file photo, FBI personnel continue excavating the site where United Flight 93 crashed after the jet was hijacked during the 9/11 terrorist attacks, near Shanksville, Pa. Four shipping containers holding the remaining wreckage of United Flight 93 were buried at the Flight 93 National Memorial in a private ceremony on June 21, 2018, memorial officials said Monday, July 9, 2018. The wreckage is buried in a restricted area accessible only to loved ones of the victims, not to the public or media. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)Photo by: AP
APTOPIX Flight 93 Tower Of Voices
In this photo made with a fisheye lens, Tom Ridge the First U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security, and 43rd governor of Pennsylvania, left, joins in with some of the family, friends and volunteer representatives for the first ringing of the chimes at the dedication of the 93-foot tall Tower of Voices on Sunday, Sept. 9, 2018 at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pa. The tower contains 40 wind chimes representing the 40 people that perished in the crash of Flight 93 in the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, Pool)Photo by: AP
APTOPIX Sept 11 Anniversary Pennsylvania
Visitors to the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pa., hold a giant Flight 93 flag during a moment of remembrance Monday, Sept. 10, 2018, as the nation marks the 17th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)Photo by: AP
APTOPIX Sept 11 Anniversary Pennsylvania
A visitor to the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pa. pays his respects at the Wall of Names after a Service of Remembrance Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, as the nation marks the 17th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. The Wall of Names honor the 40 people killed in the crash of Flight 93. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)Photo by: AP
September 11 Anniversary Pennsylvania
A visitor to the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pa., views the Wall of Names on Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2019, as the nation prepares to mark the 18th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)Photo by: AP
September 11 Anniversary Pennsylvania
A piper plays in front of the boulder that marks the impact site of Flight 93 at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 10, 2020, as the nation prepares to mark the 19th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)Photo by: AP
Flight 93 Heroism Award
Visitors look from the observation platform at the Flight 93 National Memorial under a cloudy sky on Saturday, May 8, 2021, in Shanksville, Pa. The National Park Service memorial to the people who died on United Airlines Flight 93 is hard to find on a map — as the Sept, 11, 2001, terrorist attack itself slips deeper into the nation's collective memory. Families of Flight 93's 40 passengers and crew members are trying something new to change that: an annual award for heroism. Nominations open Monday through the nonprofit group, Friends of Flight 93 National Memorial. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)Photo by: AP