Massive plan to reimagine transportation in the Tampa Bay region

Your Time, Money, Quality of life..One the Line

The TBX "Reset" could also be called "Back to the Future" because when it comes to changing how you get around more and more people are asking themselves: "Roads, where we're going we don't need more roads."

The Bay Area commute ranks in the top 20 most congested metros. Commute times can easily double during peak hours and it's only getting worse.

"If we are going to continue to grow the way we are growing we are going to have to look at this problem from every possible angle," says Ed McKinney with FDOT.

On Tuesday, FDOT updated Hillsborough County leaders on the so-called "Reset" TBX plan, the $6-billion project that would expand the interstates by adding express toll lanes.

But it's not just expanding the roads, FDOT also wants to expand the rails by adding mass transit into Tampa's daily transportation diet.

"It's not going to be one solution, it's not going to be transit, it's not going to be expanding roadways...it's going to be technology solutions, traffic management, and working with companies on staggering work hours," says McKinney.

Solutions that don't come cheap.

When asked if there are concerns about funding McKinney says, "Absolutely, this region needs to stay committed to finding a solution we can't back off from that."

But if there's one thing FDOT has learned, it's how to listen.

"The community also wants to have a say in what that answer is," he says.

Which brings us back to the future...a future FDOT sees as Tampa being a model for other cities. And the days of traditional commuting are numbered. But are they about to come to an end?

"Um I thing people are making different choices. Now whether people get away from cars, I don't want to say that," he says.

For the next two years FDOT will be gathering public feedback, before they break ground on anything.

Their tone is very different from when they first tried to sell the public on TBX.

Expect to see a lot of public workshops as they want people to be engaged.

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