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St. Pete women's clinic opens brand new facility

Posted at 8:43 PM, Feb 01, 2016

Kathyrn Lynn lost her job four years ago, the depression of not being able to find another  she said lead not only to an alcohol addiction, but homelessness and feeling helpless.

"No, I never imagined, entertained the thought that this would happen to me," said Lynn.

She started to cry when she shared her acceptance at the new St. Petersburg Women's Clinic.

"They are giving me an awesome chance, a blessed opportunity to be here and the hand up I have always been needing, to learning life skills other than picking up a drink," said Lynn.

The building, replaces an old facility built in 1989. It is not only double in size, Program Director Cynthia Burnham said it offers women a chance to really feel like part of a family.

"I think we are special because we are home, we are a safe place," said Burnham.

Burnham also said the vision came from a local couple, Virgina and David Baldwin.

Through a generous donation, never disclosed, they hoped to help where the government couldn't.

All meant to help women like Lynn , hitting dead ends through state and federal programs.

This facility not only offers a stable place to live but helps them to move foward.

"We're very focused on intensive case management," said Burnham.

Decades later, the facility is still mostly funded through the generosity of others like the Baldwins.

When Kathyrn Lynn lost her job four years ago, the depression of not being able to find another  led not only to alcohol addiction but homelessness and feeling helpless.
 
"I never imagined, entertained the thought that this would happen to me," Lynn said.
 
She started to cry when she shared her acceptance into the new St. Petersburg Women's Clinic.
 
"They are giving me an awesome chance, a blessed opportunity to be here, and the hand up I have always been needing, to learning life skills other than picking up a drink," Lynn said.
 
The building replaces an older facility built in 1989. It is not only double the size, Program Director Cynthia Burnham said, it offers women a chance to really feel like part of a family.
 
"I think we are special because we are home, we are a safe place," Burnham said.
 
Burnham also said the vision came from a local couple, Virginia and David Baldwin.
 
Through a generous donation, never disclosed, they hoped to help where the government couldn't.
 
They aimed to help women like Lynn, who hit dead ends through state and federal programs.
 
This facility not only offers a stable place to live but helps them move forward.
 
"We're very focused on intensive case management," Burnham said.
 
Decades later, the facility is still mostly funded through the generosity of others like the Baldwins.
 
The new building can house, feed, offer emotional support and life lessons for as many as 50 women, more than double of the old facility.
 
The women can also live there free of charge for up to a year and a half.
 
Burnham fields more than a hundred calls a month, and she encourages women to keep trying to get in.
 
Those who are committed to change like Lynn, are given the chance.
 
Lynn is focused on learning a new trade. She wants to make jewelry and make a new life for herself.
 
"This was a great opportunity, and I want to say thank you," she said through tears.