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How your phone screen can lead to an increased risk of cancer, diabetes and obesity

Posted: 1:47 AM, Mar 30, 2018
Updated: 2018-03-30 07:44:23-04

The importance of darkness is not something many think about, but it's becoming abundantly clear just how much our bodies need it. 

Dr. Courtney Hunt with Desert Jewel Wellness in Scottsdale says when looking at a blue light after dark, it turns off the body's ability to make melatonin, which is the hormone responsible for deep sleep.

Blue light can come from a variety of sources like phones, tablets, computers, televisions or household LED lights. 

Medical studies have shown that blue light disrupts the circadian rhythm (the body's internal clock) and that could lead to health issues. 

A report published in 2016 by the American Medical Association showed, "a long-term increase in the risk for cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity from chronic sleep disruption or shiftwork and associated with exposure to brighter light sources in the evening or night."

So what can we do to protect ourselves?

Dr. Hunt recommends getting blue-blocking glasses and wearing them in front of a screen, especially when working on a computer or tablet at night. 

Smartphone users can also downlaod apps like f.lux on your devices that change the color temperature of the screen.