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Safety improvements coming to Lake Morton Drive in Lakeland after several swans killed by drivers

Posted at 9:15 AM, Feb 18, 2019
and last updated 2019-02-18 19:19:34-05

LAKELAND, Fla. — The City of Lakeland crews will start resurfacing Lake Morton Drive starting Monday, February 18.

The project is expected to be completed on or before Thursday, February 28. The road will be open with lane closures for the duration of the project so motorists should expect delays if traveling on Lake Morton Drive.

The project will also include improving two crosswalks by adding flashing beacons. The beacon systems will be installed at the crossing near Louise Place and the crossing near Chiles Street (this crossing may be moved about 20-50 feet to the south to improve drainage).

“The design enhancements came about after we started looking at ways to improve safety around Lake Morton. We lowered the speed from 25 mph to 20 mph and we installed designated parking boxes. These next improvements are part of the overall solution to enhance safety for all of our Lake Morton users," said Angelo Rao, Manager of Traffic and Parking Operations.

A number of traffic improvements will be completed during the project including the removal of the left turn lane on Lake Morton Drive turning onto East Palmetto Street. A new “double-yellow center line” will be installed at this location.

“We will also be installing the ladder type crosswalks on Lake Morton Drive designed with red brick herring bone contrasts. This will not only be very attractive, but the crosswalks will stand out, ultimately enhancing safety through aesthetically pleasing design," said Rao.

In the past, city officials gave people a survey asking them what improvements they would like to see.

PREVIOUSLY REPORTED: City of Lakeland to combat distracted driving around Lake Morton to protect swans

Residents asked for safety improvements after a pedestrian was severely injured and nearly five swans were killed. Police said traffic crashes have increased 10 percent to 15 percent because of distracted drivers.