Schuyler Arakawa marks one year recovery since hit by boulder

Tampa woman's impressive recovery continues

TAMPA, Fla. - It's been one year since a Tampa young woman's life changed forever. Schuyler Arakawa was rafting with friends in South America, when she was crushed by a falling boulder. (Arakawa was living in neighboring Peru at the time on a Yale fellowship.)  Since that day, her miraculous recovery has inspired thousands around the world.

It's safe to say there is no stopping Schuyler Arakawa.

The 23-year-old is grateful to be getting around with a modified walker, and step by step, also learning to walk on her own.

"I just want to walk," said Arakawa.

"It's very emotional...very emotional because it's something we typically take for granted," said Meridith Hankenson, Schuyler's mom.

It's also deeply emotional because one year ago, doctors didn't know if Schuyler would live after being crushed by a massive boulder.  And if she did survive, they feared she'd never be the same.

"I would've thought it would've been the hardest year I've lived through.  I don't know how--but ironically it's been the most profoundly beautiful year," said Hankenson.

Schuyler's strength continues to amaze her therapists at Tampa General Hospital.

Specialized yoga is helping Schuy regain her balance, which is a big benefit in helping her overall mobility.

Her amazing recovering continues to inspire thousands following the "Schuy is the Limit" Facebook page, and will soon reach an even bigger audience through the "I Love My Impossible" website.

"We all have the capability of being extraordinary, and it shouldn't take a boulder for you to see that in yourself and embrace it," Hankenson said.

As for Schuyler, she's laser focused on a complete recovery.  The family is dreaming one day, she'll be back to helping those who need it most.

"This is going to be the diving board for her that catapults her to a completely new level.  So there's no question in my mind, that however she does it, she'll do something even more amazing than she would've been capable of doing before," said Hankenson.

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