New Jersey Governor Chris Christie losing support from Florida voters following Bridgegate scandal

HAMDEN, Conn. - A new Quinnipiac University poll finds New Jersey Governor Chris Christie's recent scandals are hurting his chance to win over Florida voters if he runs for President in 2016.

The poll finds former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and former Florida Governor Jeb Bush are Florida voters' current favorites to win their parties' presidential nominations.

Clinton dominates Vice President Joe Biden 64% to 9% in a Florida Democratic Primary. No other Democrat is polling above 5%.

In a hypothetical Republican primary, Bush leads with 25%, followed by Senator Marco Rubio with 16%, Tennessee Senator Rand Paul with 11%, Texas Senator Ted Cruz with 9%, Christie with 9%, and Wisconsin Representative Paul Ryan with 5%.

The Bridgegate scandal is hurting Governor Christie's Florida poll numbers. He has lost 14% of his support in just over two months.

"Christie isn't finding any sun in the Sunshine State" said Peter Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute. "Since Florida is the nation's largest swing state, and one of the early primary states, the numbers are not good news for the New Jersey governor as he tries to weather the storm from the controversy."

In hypothetical matchups between Clinton and the GOP potential candidates, only Bush is polling higher than 41%:

  • Clinton 49% – 43% over Sen. Rubio
  • Clinton 51% – 41% over Sen. Rubio
  • Clinton 52% – 39% over Rep. Ryan
  • Clinton 53% – 38% over Sen. Paul
  • Clinton 51% – 35% over Gov. Christie
  • Clinton 54% – 34% over Sen. Cruz

The poll numbers are not so good for another Democrat. Fifty-three percent of Florida voters disapprove of the job President Obama is doing. The only categories of Florida voters that approve of the job he is doing are Democrats, African-Americans and Hispanics.

The Quinnipiac University poll was conducted from January 22 to 27 and has a margin of error of +/- 2.5 percentage points.

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